Graduate Student Fellows

4 panel image of people voting, people holding yes, no, don't know signs, cartoon about polling trust, map of usa with colored precincts

In Fall 2021 the Citrin Center initiated its Fellows Program, created to recruit promising scholars in public opinion research to UC Berkeley.  The Graduate Admissions Committee for the Charles and Louise Travers Department of Political Science identified outstanding applicants with the relevant interests to be Citrin Fellows.  Fellows are provided with a $2000 research grant to help launch their research.

2022 Citrin Graduate Fellows

Christian Caballero (2022)

Christian Caballero is a PhD student in the Department of Political Science at the University of California, Berkeley. He graduated from New York University with a B.A. in Politics (with Honors) and a B.A. in Sociology (2022). He has worked as a research assistant for NYU’s Center for Social Media and Politics, as well as for faculty in both NYU and Berkeley’s Departments of Political Science. He was previously an APSA Ralph Bunche Research Scholar (2021). His research interests are broadly in American Politics and Political Behavior, where he is specifically interested in the study of social interactions, online information environments, and how they influence collective mass behavior.

John Konicki (2022)

John Konicki is a first-year PhD student at Berkeley, with a focus on American politics, political behavior, and public opinion. His specific research interests lie at the intersection of ideology, identity, and political polarization. John graduated from Vanderbilt University in 2019 with a B.A. in political science and a minor in Russian studies. After graduating, he worked as a economic policy research associate at the American Enterprise Institute (AEI), where he contributed to analysis and commentary on immigration, zoning policy, space exploration, and science research funding.

2021 Citrin Graduate Fellows

Matt Easton Photo

Matt Easton (2022)

Matt Easton graduated from Brigham Young University in 2019 as the Political Science valedictorian. His article “The Democracy of Dating: How Political Affiliations Shape Relationship Formation” was published in the Journal of Experimental Political Science. His research portfolio has received a variety of accolades, including first place in Civic Engagement at the Mary Lou Fulton Undergraduate Research Conference. He has worked as a research assistant to Dr. John Holbein and as fellow to the Center of the Study of Elections and Democracy (CSED). He interned with the United Nations Human Rights Council in Geneva and researched public policy in New Delhi, India. Matt recently worked as a political campaign organizer. He is particularly interested in research questions pertaining to political polarization in the United States. His broad research interests are in American politics, public opinion, and political behavior.

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Jack Citrin Center for Public Opinion Research
UC Berkeley
The Charles and Louise Travers Department of Political Science
798 Social Sciences Building #1950
Berkeley, CA 94720-1950
citrincenter@berkeley.edu